Saturday, July 14, 2007

Highs and lows of humanity

Today we took the kids to the National Museum of Women in the Arts to see the Italian Renaissance show. There were a surprising number of Artemisia Gentileschi pieces, including this famous one of Judith and her maidservant beheading Holofernes. They were great to finally see in person. I thought, because her paintings are all so expressive, that the surface of the paintings would be more textured. But they're smooth as glass. It was a little unnerving, actually.

The high point of the excursion was getting to see the Gentileschis and the paintings by Sofonisba Anguissola, which were stunning. The low point was shortly after Liam threw himself to the ground in that limp-octopus mode that toddlers sometimes go into. He didn't want me to carry him, but we didn't want him to go running around the gallery, possibly getting his grubby hands on the paintings before we could stop him. I half-dragged him into a side room to try to get some control, and wasn't there for two seconds before a woman told me to keep him quiet because she couldn't hear the video, despite the fact that she was standing in the doorway of the video room and for god's sake it's just a fricking video, go read a book.

I almost took a picture of her because she was so awful, but I'm sure you know the type, anyway — overly thin, overly tan, crispy but stylish hair, and too well dressed and way too much make-up for 11 a.m. on a Saturday morning.

At any rate, to the bee-faced cee (PMF) at NMWA this morning: I'm sorry my son made you miss 15 seconds of the video that I'm sure they sell in the gift store, and, yes, I'm sure your Yorkies would never behave so badly in public. Go eff yourself.

Later we went to a friend's birthday party. The kids dragged out the dress-up clothes trunk, and then came outside to show us what they were wearing. I honestly could not have been prouder to see Thea wearing just her underwear, a cat's tail, and rosary beads.

11 comments:

Heather said...

If it's any consolation, happy people don't crab @ strangers. Crazy lady. Misery loves company & all that...

nylonthread said...

Thea was the cutest in her cat costume! Connor was a close second -- kudos for being the only boy to join in. And, I wish I'd had videotape when Dash ran headfirst into the side of Sue & Don's house...slapstick at its finest!

Kelly O said...

That actually is some consolation, thanks!

Dash was HILARIOUS, but man that made me cringe. What a cutie.

monkeyrotica said...

I for one can't WAIT until I'm a shriveled old batfart screaming at kids in museums. Then again, I'll probably be the one escorted out for spitting at the Morris Louis'.

sher said...

::wicked witch music::
da duh da duh da duhhhh-duhh...etc.

now playing inside my head. repeatedly.

i wish i had been there. i love taking out ass-hats like that.

Kelly O said...

I wish you had been there, too. I was at a loss.

AJS, if you were spitting at a Thomas Kinkade instead of a Louis you'd be a hero.

monkeyrotica said...

I reserve my finest, warmest feces for throwing at Thomas Kincaid. Although, I can't imagine what kind of "museum" would carry Kincaids. I thought those things were reserved for rent-by-the-hour hotel rooms and lobbys of sanitariums where the post-electroshock patients linger, drool oozing from their bite guards.

sher said...

give me a velvet elvis anyday, man.

;-)

mom said...

One of the things that gives me the greatest pleasure in my life is the sight and chatter of well loved children. Well loved children have a certain glow to them, almost like a light beneath the skin. Their eyes are simultaneously "wise" and "innocent" and although they may be hesitant to express their knowledge or emotions, they do not fear the "you are so stupid" put down that crushes a very young child's spirit.

I love watching the way a best beloved new member of the family works things out. You can tell how emotionally nourished a child is when a well loved child watches other children prepatory to play, the way they approach adults, their cuddliness, their trust...

I could gush on....

The child who is wary - (different behavior from a child that needs to size a strange adult up before they interact) - unsure of parental love, fearful of rejection or fearful of abuse... those children that are so prevalent in our society -

So a cybertoast to all the lovely small humans I've met and a huge cybertoast to the parents of those gorgeous creatures....

I feel like I've beamed into an enclave of people whose values I admire and who practice those values. It is a wonderful view of life and friendship - and most importantly, thank you for raising well loved children.

It brings me joy.

Monica said...

I forgot to tell you -- but I volunteer at NMWA and the Smithsonian's NMNH now. The lady you described sounds like some of the monsters who pop in to go through the museum... but in general they have a very open policy. In fact they plan special things for kids and if you call NMWA ahead of time will arrage a special tour of the collection or a special exhibit just so the kids will get more out of it.

Though now that I'm thinking of it -- they prefer the kids to at least be in kindergarten ... so keep it in mind when Liam's 4. :)

Kelly O said...

Oh, the NMNH! I should TOTALLY take the kids there, thanks for the reminder! Why didn't I think of that?